Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2015, Article ID 632158, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/632158
Research Article

Serological Evidence of Henipavirus among Horses and Pigs in Zaria and Environs in Kaduna State, Nigeria

1Department of Animal Production and Health, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Federal University of Wukari, Katsina-Ala Road, PMB 1020, Wukari, Taraba, Nigeria
2Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, PMB 1045, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
3School of Life Sciences, W/A1316 Microbiology, Queen’s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

Received 28 August 2015; Revised 8 October 2015; Accepted 13 October 2015

Academic Editor: Béla Dénes

Copyright © 2015 Olaolu T. Olufemi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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