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Applied Bionics and Biomechanics
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5813154, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5813154
Research Article

Bilateral, Misalignment-Compensating, Full-DOF Hip Exoskeleton: Design and Kinematic Validation

1Department of Mechanical Engineering and Flanders Make, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
2Department of Physical Education and Physiotherapy Rehabilitation Research, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels, Belgium
3Rehabilitation Hospital Inkendaal, Inkendaalstraat 1, Vlezenbeek, 1602 Sint-Pieters-Leeuw, Belgium

Correspondence should be addressed to Karen Junius; eb.buv@suinuj.nerak

Received 7 March 2017; Revised 29 May 2017; Accepted 15 June 2017; Published 16 July 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea Cereatti

Copyright © 2017 Karen Junius et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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