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Applied Bionics and Biomechanics
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6450949, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6450949
Research Article

A FEM-Experimental Approach for the Development of a Conceptual Linear Actuator Based on Tendril’s Free Coiling

1Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano, Italy
2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Renato Vidoni; ti.zbinu@inodiv.otaner

Received 10 March 2017; Revised 15 May 2017; Accepted 30 May 2017; Published 25 July 2017

Academic Editor: Estefanía Peña

Copyright © 2017 Luca Cortese et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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