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Advances in Bioinformatics
Volume 2013, Article ID 527295, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/527295
Research Article

MRMPath and MRMutation, Facilitating Discovery of Mass Transitions for Proteotypic Peptides in Biological Pathways Using a Bioinformatics Approach

1Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
2Department of Computer and Information Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
4Centers for Nutrient-Gene Interactions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
5Targeted Metabolomics and Proteomics Laboratory, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

Received 23 September 2012; Revised 20 December 2012; Accepted 20 December 2012

Academic Editor: Erchin Serpedin

Copyright © 2013 Chiquito Crasto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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