Autoimmune Diseases
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Protective Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment on Axon Degeneration after Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy

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Autoimmune Diseases publishes original research articles and review articles on all aspects of autoimmunity. Articles focus on the basic biology and mechanism of the disease, and medical treatment of autoimmune diseases.

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Autoimmune Diseases maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Fungal Infections among Psoriatic Patients: Etiologic Agents, Comorbidities, and Vulnerable Population

Background. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin and joint, affecting nearly 2-3% of the general population. It is assumed that imbalance between the types of natural microflora can accelerate the onset of the disease. Some fungi can play the role of superantigens and prolong chronic inflammation in the skin of psoriatic patients. The aim of the present investigation was to identify fungal species isolated from patients with psoriasis. Methods. From March 2016 to May 2019, 289 patients with prior diagnosis of psoriasis were included in this survey. Direct microscopy with potassium hydroxide (KOH 10%), culture, urea hydrolysis, hair perforation test, and growth on rice grains were used to identify clinical isolates, phenotypically. For molecular identification of Candida species and Malassezia species, PCR-RFLP and PCR-sequencing were used, respectively. Results. Forty-six out of 289 psoriatic patients had fungal infections (15.9%). Dermatophytes (54.3%), Candida spp. (19.5%), Malassezia spp. (15.2%), Aspergillus spp. (6.5%), and Fusarium spp. (4.3%) were the causative agents of fungal infections. Among Malassezia and Candida species, M. restricta (10.8%) and C. glabrata (8.7%) were the most prevalent species, respectively. Conclusion. Our findings suggested that fungal pathogens, particularly dermatophytes, may play an important role in the pathogenicity of psoriasis. Also, due to the high rate of yeast colonization in the clinical samples of psoriatic patients, concomitant use of anti-inflammatory drugs and antifungals may represent an effective therapeutic approach for better management of chronic lesions among these patients. Mycological tests should be applied to indicate the incidence of fungal diseases in psoriatic patients.

Research Article

Interleukin-18 in Brazilian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Can Leflunomide Reduce It?

Objectives. Rheumatoid arthritis affects about 1% of the world’s population. This is a chronic autoimmune disease. It is predominant in females with progressive joint damage. Immune cells are involved, especially Th1/Th17 lymphocytes and their inflammatory cytokines. These proteins have different functions in the immune system, such as IL-16 is a chemotactic factor; IL-18 can activate NFκB transcription producing inflammatory proteins; IL-31 can activate the JAK/STAT pathway which leads to the production of inflammatory factors in chronic diseases; IL-33 promotes IL-16 secretion which causes lymphocyte recruitment, and IL-32 and IL-34 appear to increase TNF secretion by macrophages activation in AR. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum levels of IL-16, IL-18, IL-31, IL-32, IL-33, and IL-34 and compare them with the severity and treatment of RA patients if there are any correlations. Methods. A total of 140 RA patients and 40 healthy donors were recruited from the Department of Rheumatology at Hospital das Clínicas from the Federal University of Pernambuco. 60 AR patients were naïve for any treatment. Serum cytokine levels were determined using an ELISA kit. Results. Serum IL-16 ( = 0.0491), IL-18 ( < 0.0001), IL-31 ( = 0.0004), and IL-32 ( = 0.0040) levels were significantly increased in RA patients compared with healthy donors. It was observed that patients using leflunomide had the lowest IL-18 levels, close to controls levels ( = 0.0064). Conclusion. IL-16, IL-18, IL-31, and IL-32 are increased in the serum of RA patients. IL-18 is at lower levels in those AR who are taking leflunomide as treatment.

Review Article

New Studies of Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Collagen-Induced and Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Models: New Insight Involving Bacteria Flora

Much public research suggests that autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are induced by aberrant “self” immune responses attacking autologous tissues and organ components. However, recent studies have reported that autoimmune diseases may be triggered by dysbiotic composition changes of the intestinal bacteria and an imbalance between these bacteria and intestinal immune systems. However, there are a few solid concepts or methods to study the putative involvement and relationship of these inner environmental factors in RA pathogenesis. Fortunately, Collagen-Induced Arthritis (CIA) and Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis (CAIA) models have been widely used as animal models for studying the pathogenesis of RA. In addition to RA, these models can be extensively used as animal models for studying complicated hypotheses in many diseases. In this review, we introduce some basic information about the CIA and CAIA models as well as how to apply these models effectively to investigate relationships between the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, especially RA, and the dysbiosis of intestinal bacterial flora.

Research Article

Familial Risks between Pernicious Anemia and Other Autoimmune Diseases in the Population of Sweden

Background. Pernicious anemia (PA) is an autoimmune disease (AID) which is caused by lack of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) due to its impaired uptake. PA is a multifactorial disease which is associated with a number of other AID comorbidities and which is manifested as part of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Due to the shortage of family studies on PA, we planned to address the problem by assessing familial risks for concordant PA between family members and for discordant PA in families of other AID patients. Methods. We collected data on patients diagnosed with AIDs from the Swedish hospitals and family data from a population register. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) in families for concordant and discordant risks. Results. The number of PA patients in the offspring generation (for which the familial risk was calculated) was 7701; 278 (3.6%) patients had a family history of PA. The population prevalence of PA was 0.9/1000. The familial risk for PA was 3.88 when any first-degree relative was the proband, equal for men and women. The familial risk was two times higher between siblings than between offspring and parents which may be due to complex genetic background. Associations of PA with 14 discordant AIDs were significant; these included some AIDs that have previously been described as comorbidities in PA patients and several yet unreported associations, including rheumatoid arthritis and other AIDs. Conclusions. The familial risks for PA were high suggesting multifactorial genetic etiology. The results call for further population-level studies to unravel mechanisms of familial PA which may help to understand the etiology of this disease.

Research Article

Therapeutic Plasma Exchange as a Treatment for Autoimmune Neurological Disease

Introduction. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is commonly used as treatment of certain autoimmune neurological diseases (ANDs), and its main objective is the removal of pathogenic autoantibodies. Our aim was to describe the clinical profile and the experience with the usage of TPE in patients with ANDs at our institution. Methods. This is an observational retrospective study, including medical records of patients with diagnosis of ANDs who received TPE, between 2011 and 2018. Characteristics of TPE, such as number of cycles, type of replacement solution, and adverse effects, were evaluated. The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was applied to measure the clinical response after the therapy. Results. 187 patients were included with the following diagnoses: myasthenia gravis (MG), n = 70 (37%); Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), n = 53 (28.3%), neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), n = 35 (18.7%); chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), n = 23 (12.2%); and autoimmune encephalitis (AE), n = 6 (3.2%). The most used types of replacement solution were albumin (n = 131, 70%) and succinylated gelatin (n = 45, 24%). All patients received a median of five cycles (IQR 5-5). Hypotension and hydroelectrolytic disorders were the main complications. After TPE, 99 patients (52.9%) showed improvement in the mRS scores and a statistical significance () was seen between the admission score and after TPE for every diagnosis except for CIDP. Conclusion. TPE has an adequate safety profile, and improvement in functionality in treated patients reflects its effectiveness.

Review Article

The Influence of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Immune System and Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple roles have been indicated for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the immune system in recent years. ROS have been extensively studied due to their ability to damage DNA and other subcellular structures. Noticeably, they have been identified as a pivotal second messenger for T-cell receptor signaling and T-cell activation and participate in antigen cross-presentation and chemotaxis. As an agent with direct toxic effects on cells, ROS lead to the initiation of the autoimmune response. Moreover, ROS levels are regulated by antioxidant systems, which include enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. Enzymatic antioxidants include superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. Nonenzymatic antioxidants contain vitamins C, A, and E, glutathione, and thioredoxin. Particularly, cellular antioxidant systems have important functions in maintaining the redox system homeostasis. This review will discuss the significant roles of ROS generation and antioxidant systems under normal conditions, in the immune system, and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

Autoimmune Diseases
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
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CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.340
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.