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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2012, Article ID 593720, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/593720
Review Article

Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

Center for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Carrera 24 no. 63C-69 Bogotá, Colombia

Received 11 October 2011; Revised 6 December 2011; Accepted 14 December 2011

Academic Editor: Juan-Manuel Anaya

Copyright © 2012 Paula Quintero-Ronderos and Gladis Montoya-Ortiz. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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