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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2012, Article ID 784315, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/784315
Review Article

The Biological Significance of Evolution in Autoimmune Phenomena

1Rheumatology Unit, Fundación Valle del Lili, ICESI University, Avenida Simón Bolívar Cra. 98 No.18-49, Cali, Colombia
2Fundación Valle del Lili, Medical School, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia

Received 14 September 2011; Accepted 28 December 2011

Academic Editor: Juan-Manuel Anaya

Copyright © 2012 Carlos A. Cañas and Felipe Cañas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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