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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2012, Article ID 969657, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/969657
Review Article

Is Multiple Sclerosis an Autoimmune Disease?

1Departments of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Division of Neurology, Saga University Faculty of Medicine, Saga 849-8501, Japan
3Department of Internal Medicine and Advanced Comprehensive Functional Recovery Center, Saga University Faculty of Medicine, Saga 849-8501, Japan
4Departments of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 30 January 2012; Revised 5 March 2012; Accepted 15 March 2012

Academic Editor: Hiroshi Ikegami

Copyright © 2012 Bharath Wootla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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