Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2013, Article ID 613086, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/613086
Review Article

Genetics of Psoriasis and Pharmacogenetics of Biological Drugs

1Servicio de Farmacología Clínica, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto Teófilo Hernando, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IP), 28006 Madrid, Spain
2Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IP), 28006 Madrid, Spain
3Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28006 Madrid, Spain

Received 3 May 2013; Accepted 19 July 2013

Academic Editor: Jozélio Freire De Carvalho

Copyright © 2013 Rocío Prieto-Pérez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. The causes of psoriasis are unknown, although family and twin studies have shown genetic factors to play a key role in its development. The many genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response include TNFα, IL23, and IL12. Advances in knowledge of the pathogenesis of psoriasis have enabled the development of new drugs that target cytokines (e.g., etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab, which target TNFα, and ustekinumab, which targets the p40 subunit of IL23 and IL12). These drugs have improved the safety and efficacy of treatment in comparison with previous therapies. However, not all patients respond equally to treatment, possibly owing to interindividual genetic variability. In this review, we describe the genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response, the biological drugs used to treat chronic severe plaque psoriasis, new drugs in phase II and III trials, and current knowledge on the implications of pharmacogenomics in predicting response to these treatments.