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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2014, Article ID 203435, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/203435
Review Article

Genes Associated with SLE Are Targets of Recent Positive Selection

1Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
2Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
3Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine and Center for Public Health Genomics, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA

Received 23 September 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editor: Juan-Manuel Anaya

Copyright © 2014 Paula S. Ramos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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