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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2015, Article ID 751853, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/751853
Research Article

Predisposition to Cervical Atypia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Clinical and Cytopathological Study

1Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2Pathology Department, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
3Gynecology and Obstetrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Received 28 November 2014; Accepted 26 January 2015

Academic Editor: Yehuda Shoenfeld

Copyright © 2015 Hend Hilal Al-Sherbeni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with variable presentations, course, and prognosis. The female genital tract may be a potential target organ in SLE since cervical inflammation may be associated with disease activity. An increase in cervical dysplasia, a precursor of cervical cancer, has been reported in females with SLE. Aim of the Work. This work aimed to study the prevalence of abnormal cervicovaginal smears in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to correlate abnormal smear findings with exposure to infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) in SLE patients. Patients and Methods. Thirty-two patients with SLE, fulfilling the 1997 revised criteria for the classification of SLE, were included in this study. They were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and cervicovaginal smearing. Twenty healthy subjects not known to suffer from any rheumatological disease were used as controls, and they were subjected to cervicovaginal smearing. Results. Four out of 32 SLE patients showed abnormal Pap smears (12.5%) compared to none showing any cervical changes in the control group (0%). Among these 4 patients, 3 were having ASCU and one was having LSIL (HPV). Conclusion. Cervicovaginal smearing is an easy, economic, safe, repeatable, and noninvasive technique for screening and early detection of cervical neoplastic lesions in SLE.