Table of Contents
Advances in Ecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 430431, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/430431
Research Article

Harvesting as an Alternative to Burning for Managing Spinifex Grasslands in Australia

1Aboriginal Environments Research Centre, School of Architecture and Institute of Social Science Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
2School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
3School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia

Received 16 April 2014; Revised 5 June 2014; Accepted 16 June 2014; Published 6 July 2014

Academic Editor: Isabelle Bertrand

Copyright © 2014 Harshi K. Gamage et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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