Table of Contents
Advances in Ecology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 456904, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/456904
Review Article

Experiments Are Revealing a Foundation Species: A Case Study of Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)

Harvard Forest, Harvard University, 324 North Main Street, Petersham, MA 01366, USA

Received 27 April 2014; Accepted 28 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Alistair Bishop

Copyright © 2014 Aaron M. Ellison. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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