Table of Contents
Advances in Ecology
Volume 2015, Article ID 357080, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/357080
Research Article

Resource Selection by an Endangered Ungulate: A Test of Predator-Induced Range Abandonment

1Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, 921 South 8th Avenue, Stop 8007, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA
2Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Recovery Program, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, 407 West Line Street, Bishop, CA 93514, USA
3California Department of Fish and Wildlife, P.O. Box 3222, Big Bear City, CA 92314, USA
4Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8000, USA

Received 30 September 2014; Accepted 3 January 2015

Academic Editor: Tomasz S. Osiejuk

Copyright © 2015 Jeffrey T. Villepique et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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