Table of Contents
Advances in Environmental Chemistry
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 243785, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/243785
Research Article

Utilization of Cellulose from Luffa cylindrica Fiber as Binder in Acetaminophen Tablets

1Faculty of Science, Technology and Mathematics, College of Teacher Development, Philippine Normal University, 1000 Manila, Philippines
2College of Graduate Studies and Teacher Education Research, Philippine Normal University, 1000 Manila, Philippines

Received 27 September 2014; Revised 22 February 2015; Accepted 22 February 2015

Academic Editor: Jesus Simal-Gandara

Copyright © 2015 John Carlo O. Macuja et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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