Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 247258, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/247258
Research Article

Prevalence of Fascioliasis in Cattle Slaughtered in Sokoto Metropolitan Abattoir, Sokoto, Nigeria

1Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, PMB 2346, Sokoto, Nigeria
2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, PMB 2346, Sokoto, Nigeria
3Veterinary Council of Nigeria, Maitama, Abuja, Nigeria
4Department of Veterinary Parasitology and Entomology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, PMB 2346, Sokoto, Nigeria

Received 19 June 2014; Revised 2 October 2014; Accepted 17 October 2014; Published 9 November 2014

Academic Editor: Toru Mori

Copyright © 2014 A. A. Magaji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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