Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 328102, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/328102
Research Article

Epidemiological Transition in Urban Population of Maharashtra

1International Institute for Population Science, Govandi Station Road, Deonar, Mumbai 400088, India
2Department of Development Studies, Giri Institute of Development Studies, Sector “0”, Aliganj Housing Scheme, Lucknow 226024, India
3University of Connecticut, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030, USA

Received 23 July 2014; Accepted 14 October 2014; Published 18 November 2014

Academic Editor: Peng Bi

Copyright © 2014 Rahul Koli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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