Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 819146, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/819146
Research Article

Previous Preterm Birth and Current Maternal Complications as a Risk Factor of Subsequent Stillbirth

1Department of Biostatistics, Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, AHC2 576A, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2Department of Public Health, College of Health and Human Services, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Boulevard, Bowling Green, KY 42101, USA
3Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33012, USA
4Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 3701 Kirby Drive, Suite 600, Houston, TX 77098, USA

Received 29 April 2015; Revised 8 July 2015; Accepted 15 July 2015

Academic Editor: Peter N. Lee

Copyright © 2015 Boubakari Ibrahimou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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