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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 237038, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/237038
Review Article

Are Soil Pollution Risks Established by Governments the Same as Actual Risks?

IBED, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 166, 1018 WV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Received 26 February 2009; Accepted 20 July 2009

Academic Editor: Amarilis de Varennes

Copyright © 2009 L. Reijnders. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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