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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 319721, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/319721
Research Article

Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

1Microbial Ecology Group, School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
2Agriculture Department, Askham Bryan College, Askham Bryan, York 23 3FR, UK
3Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9
4Soil Biology Group, School of Earth and Environment (M087), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, WA 6009 Crawley, Australia

Received 30 January 2010; Accepted 16 June 2010

Academic Editor: Oliver Dilly

Copyright © 2010 Deirdre C. Rooney et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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