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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2011, Article ID 237071, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/237071
Research Article

Trace Element Concentration and Speciation in Selected Mining-Contaminated Soils and Water in Willow Creek Floodplain, Colorado

1United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS), National Soil Survey Center, Lincoln, NE 68508, USA
2USDA-NRCS, Gainesville, FL 32606-6677, USA
3USDA-NRCS, Denver, CO 80225-0426, USA
4USDA-NRCS, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA

Received 26 May 2011; Accepted 16 August 2011

Academic Editor: Yongchao Liang

Copyright © 2011 R. Burt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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