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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2012, Article ID 769357, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/769357
Research Article

Oilseed Meal Effects on the Emergence and Survival of Crop and Weed Species

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University, 370 Olsen Boulevard, 2474 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-2474, USA

Received 28 October 2011; Revised 20 December 2011; Accepted 23 December 2011

Academic Editor: Philip White

Copyright © 2012 Katie L. Rothlisberger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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