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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 803821, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/803821
Research Article

Aluminum-Tolerant Pisolithus Ectomycorrhizas Confer Increased Growth, Mineral Nutrition, and Metal Tolerance to Eucalyptus in Acidic Mine Spoil

1Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL 60022, USA
2Program in Plant Biology and Conservation, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA

Received 9 April 2015; Revised 14 August 2015; Accepted 27 August 2015

Academic Editor: Oliver Dilly

Copyright © 2015 Louise Egerton-Warburton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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