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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2707989, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2707989
Review Article

Oil and Gas Production Wastewater: Soil Contamination and Pollution Prevention

Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA

Received 25 November 2015; Accepted 14 February 2016

Academic Editor: Ezio Ranieri

Copyright © 2016 John Pichtel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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