Applied and Environmental Soil Science

Use of Waste Materials to Improve Soil Fertility and Increase Crop Quality and Quantity


Publishing date
15 Nov 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 May 2011

Lead Editor

1Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali e delle Produzioni Vegetali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona, Italy

2Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 307 M.B. Sturgis Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA

3Departamento de Edafoloxía e Química Agrícola, Escola Politécnica Superior, Universidada de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario, Lugo, Spain

4Oficiul Pentru Studii Pedologice si Agrochimice Cluj, Street Fagului 1, Cluj-Napoca, Judetul Cluj, Romania


Use of Waste Materials to Improve Soil Fertility and Increase Crop Quality and Quantity

Description

The agricultual practice of fertilization was developed long ago to increase crop production and maintain a certain soil use. For millennia, cultivated soils have been ammended with materials of various origins (feces, vegetable waste, stones, charcoal, ash, compost, phosphogypsum, etc.) to enhance their physical, chemical, or biological properties. The formation of the plaggen horizon or the terra preta are examples of soil change induced by the addition of materials. Similarly, anthropogenic changes in climatic soil variables such as floodwater control, desertification of overgrazed lands, and the use of albedo-minimizing mulches have the potential to alter soil ecology and biodegradation. In the last few decades, concurrent with the addition of fertilizers, cultivated soils have received waste materials from a wide variety of anthropogenic activities. While the reuse of waste materials is a noble practice, it can also pose threats to environmental quality if not properly implemented. In many cases, simple characterization of the materials themselves may lead to false assumptions concerning the safe use and disposal of waste materials in cultivated soils. To better understand the dynamics of soil fertilty, food/crop quality, and how they are impacted by waste materials used as soil ammendments, profound study on the impact to soils is warranted.

This special issue will evaluate the impact of several types of waste materials on (1) soil physical, chemical, and biological changes induced by the addition of soil ammendments, (2) the effects those practices have on the quality and quantity of crops, and (3) the eventual modification of factors controlling agro-ecosystems (soil, water, air, wild plants, and animals). Potential topics include, but are not limited to, waste materials coming from several types of anthropogenic activities:

  • Industry
  • Mining
  • Agronomic production (cultivated crops)
  • Confined animal feeding operations (cattle, poultry, sheep, goat, and other)
  • Agroindustry
  • Fur farming
  • Production of vegetable biomass of various sources
  • Slaughterhouse waste
  • Fish processing (including products derived from aquaculture, marineculture, fish farming, and marine algae)
  • Treatment of sewage sludge and urbane waste
  • Production of fly ash
  • Pulp (paper) production
  • Composting
  • Combinations of the foregoing features

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/aess/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 204914
  • - Editorial

Use of Waste Materials to Improve Soil Fertility and Increase Crop Quality and Quantity

Giuseppe Corti | David C. Weindorf | ... | Horea Cacovean
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 832608
  • - Research Article

Compost and Wildflowers for the Management of Urban Derelict Soils

Roberto Pini | Francesca Bretzel | ... | Manuele Scatena
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 907831
  • - Research Article

Impact of Waste Materials and Organic Amendments on Soil Properties and Vegetative Performance

Steven L. McGeehan
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 234103
  • - Research Article

Productivity and Nutritive Quality of Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) as Influenced by Commercial Fertilizer, Broiler Litter, and Interseeded White Clover (Trifolium repens)

Sandra L. Dillard | Laura E. Sturgeon | ... | Russell B. Muntifering
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 395964
  • - Research Article

Organic Amendments and Earthworm Addition Improve Properties of Nonacidic Mine Tailings

P. M. Rutherford | J. M. Arocena
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 624824
  • - Research Article

Effects of Paper-Mill Sludge as a Mulch versus Topsoil Incorporation on Potassium Uptake and the Grain Yield of Rain-Fed Wheat in a High Specific Surface Loess Soil with Illite Dominance in Clay Fraction

S. Amini | S. A. R. Movahedi Naeini | K. Mashayekhi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 256312
  • - Research Article

Effects of Stubble Management on Soil Fertility and Crop Yield of Rainfed Area in Western Loess Plateau, China

G. B. Huang | Z. Z. Luo | ... | J. H. Xie
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 395453
  • - Research Article

Soil Application of Tannery Land Plaster: Effects on Nitrogen Mineralization and Soil Biochemical Properties

Caterina Giacometti | Luciano Cavani | ... | Claudio Marzadori
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 273456
  • - Research Article

Mineralization and Crop Uptake of Nitrogen from Textile Manufacturing Wastewater Sludge Cake

T. P. McGonigle | E. G. Beauchamp | ... | C. J. Wells
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 848612
  • - Research Article

Effect of ISPAD Anaerobic Digestion on Ammonia Volatilization from Soil Applied Swine Manure

Susan King | Michael Schwalb | ... | Suzelle Barrington
Applied and Environmental Soil Science
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication48 days
CiteScore2.000
Impact Factor-
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