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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2009, Article ID 179847, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/179847
Clinical Study

Myelofibrosis-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease: Retrospective Study of 16 Cases and Literature Review

1Department of Clinical Hematology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, University Hospital of Amiens, 1 Place Victor Pauchet, 80000 Amiens, France
2Department of Clinical Pathology, University Hospital of Amiens, 1 Place Victor Pauchet, 80000 Amiens, France

Received 15 July 2009; Accepted 9 October 2009

Academic Editor: Maher Albitar

Copyright © 2009 A. Etienne et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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