Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Hematology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 936761, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/936761
Research Article

Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Can Survive In Vitro for Several Months

1Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074, Japan
2Division of Hematology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan

Received 22 September 2008; Revised 8 December 2008; Accepted 15 December 2008

Academic Editor: N. Chao

Copyright © 2009 Taro Ishigaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. K. Le Blanc, F. Frassoni, L. Ball et al., “Mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of steroid-resistant, severe, acute graft-versus-host disease: a phase II study,” The Lancet, vol. 371, no. 9624, pp. 1579–1586, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. L. I. Zon, “Intrinsic and extrinsic control of haematopoietic stem-cell self-renewal,” Nature, vol. 453, no. 7193, pp. 306–313, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. T. Heike and T. Nakahata, “Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells by cytokines,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1592, no. 3, pp. 313–321, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. K. Ando, T. Yahata, T. Sato et al., “Direct evidence for ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic stem cells,” Blood, vol. 107, no. 8, pp. 3371–3377, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. T. M. Dexter, T. D. Allen, and L. G. Lajtha, “Conditions controlling the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells in vitro,” Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 335–344, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. I. D. Lewis, G. Almeida-Porada, J. Du et al., “Umbilical cord blood cells capable of engrafting in primary, secondary, and tertiary xenogeneic hosts are preserved after ex vivo culture in a noncontact system,” Blood, vol. 97, no. 11, pp. 3441–3449, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. C. L. da Silva, R. Gonçalves, K. B. Crapnell, J. M. S. Cabral, E. D. Zanjani, and G. Almeida-Porada, “A human stromal-based serum-free culture system supports the ex vivo expansion/maintenance of bone marrow and cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells,” Experimental Hematology, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 828–835, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. P. Feugier, N. Li, D.-Y. Jo et al., “Osteopetrotic mouse stroma with thrombopoietin, c-kit ligand, and flk-2 ligand supports long-term mobilized CD34+ hematopoiesis in vitro,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 505–516, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. T. Yoshikubo, T. Inoue, M. Noguchi, and H. Okabe, “Differentiation and maintenance of mast cells from CD34+ human cord blood cells,” Experimental Hematology, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 320–329, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. T. Hiroyama, K. Miharada, N. Aoki et al., “Long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis derived from primate embryonic stem cells,” Experimental Hematology, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 760–769, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. T. Nakano, H. Kodama, and T. Honjo, “Generation of lymphohematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells in culture,” Science, vol. 265, no. 5175, pp. 1098–1101, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. T. Nakano, H. Kodama, and T. Honjo, “In vitro development of primitive and definitive erythrocytes from different precursors,” Science, vol. 272, no. 5262, pp. 722–724, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. M. A. Vodyanik, J. A. Bork, J. A. Thomson, and I. I. Slukvin, “Human embryonic stem cell-derived CD34+ cells: efficient production in the coculture with OP9 stromal cells and analysis of lymphohematopoietic potential,” Blood, vol. 105, no. 2, pp. 617–626, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. T. Hiroyama, K. Miharada, K. Sudo, I. Danjo, N. Aoki, and Y. Nakamura, “Establishment of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce functional red blood cells,” PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 2, article e1544, pp. 1–11, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. N. Takayama, H. Nishikii, J. Usui et al., “Generation of functional platelets from human embryonic stem cells in vitro via ES-sacs, VEGF-promoted structures that concentrate hematopoietic progenitors,” Blood, vol. 111, no. 11, pp. 5298–5306, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. G. Hangoc, R. Daub, R. G. Maze, J. H. Falkenburg, H. E. Broxmeyer, and M. A. Harrington, “Regulation of myelopoiesis by murine fibroblastic and adipogenic cell lines,” Experimental Hematology, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 502–507, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  17. M. Nishikawa, K. Ozawa, A. Tojo et al., “Changes in hematopoiesis-supporting ability of C3H10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts during differentiation,” Blood, vol. 81, no. 5, pp. 1184–1192, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  18. T. L. Maekawa, T. A. Takahashi, M. Fujihara et al., “A novel gene (drad-1) expressed in hematopoiesis-supporting stromal cell lines, ST2, PA6 and A54 preadipocytes: use of mRNA differential display,” Stem Cells, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 334–339, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  19. T. Ueda, K. Tsuji, H. Yoshino et al., “Expansion of human NOD/SCID-repopulating cells by stem cell factor, Flk2/Flt3 ligand, thrombopoietin, IL-6, and soluble IL-6 receptor,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 105, no. 7, pp. 1013–1021, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar