Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Hematology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 473709, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/473709
Review Article

Heme Oxygenase-1: A Critical Link between Iron Metabolism, Erythropoiesis, and Development

1Laboratory for Blood Cell Development, Disciplines of Physiology, Anatomy and Histology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Medical Foundation Building, 92-94 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
2Center for Vascular Research, Discipline of Pathology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Medical Foundation Building, 92–94 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia

Received 28 June 2011; Revised 13 September 2011; Accepted 15 September 2011

Academic Editor: S. Ballas

Copyright © 2011 Stuart T. Fraser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The first mature cells to arise in the developing mammalian embryo belong to the erythroid lineage. This highlights the immediacy of the need for red blood cells during embryogenesis and for survival. Linked with this pressure is the necessity of the embryo to obtain and transport iron, synthesize hemoglobin, and then dispose of the potentially toxic heme via the stress-induced protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1 in the mouse). Null mutation of Hmox1 results in significant embryonic mortality as well as anemia and defective iron recycling. Here, we discuss the interrelated nature of this critical enzyme with iron trafficking, erythroid cell function, and embryonic survival.