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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 595060, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/595060
Review Article

Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

Department I of Internal Medicine, and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, University Hospital Cologne, Robert-Koch-Strasse 21, 50931 Cologne, Germany

Received 22 February 2011; Revised 13 May 2011; Accepted 23 May 2011

Academic Editor: Cheng-Kui Qu

Copyright © 2012 Philipp Koehler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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