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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2013, Article ID 695754, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/695754
Review Article

MicroRNAs as Haematopoiesis Regulators

Hematologic Oncology, Stem Cells and Blood Disorders Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500046, India

Received 30 July 2013; Revised 20 October 2013; Accepted 27 October 2013

Academic Editor: Aldo Roccaro

Copyright © 2013 Ram Babu Undi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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