Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
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From Chance to Serendipity: Knowledge Workers’ Experiences of Serendipitous Social Encounters

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 Journal profile

Advances in Human-Computer Interaction is an interdisciplinary journal that publishes theoretical and applied papers covering the broad spectrum of interactive systems.

 Editor spotlight

Advances in Human-Computer Interaction maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Special Issues

Do you think there is an emerging area of research that really needs to be highlighted? Or an existing research area that has been overlooked or would benefit from deeper investigation? Raise the profile of a research area by leading a Special Issue.

Latest Articles

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Review Article

A Review on Fall Prediction and Prevention System for Personal Devices: Evaluation and Experimental Results

Injuries due to unintentional falls cause high social cost in which several systems have been developed to reduce them. Recently, two trends can be recognized. Firstly, the market is dominated by fall detection systems, which activate an alarm after a fall occurrence, but the focus is moving towards predicting and preventing a fall, as it is the most promising approach to avoid a fall injury. Secondly, personal devices, such as smartphones, are being exploited for implementing fall systems, because they are commonly carried by the user most of the day. This paper reviews various fall prediction and prevention systems, with a particular interest to the ones that can rely on the sensors embedded in a smartphone, i.e., accelerometer and gyroscope. Kinematic features obtained from the data collected from accelerometer and gyroscope have been evaluated in combination with different machine learning algorithms. An experimental analysis compares the evaluated approaches by evaluating their accuracy and ability to predict and prevent a fall. Results show that tilt features in combination with a decision tree algorithm present the best performance.

Research Article

What Methods Software Teams Prefer When Testing Web Accessibility

Accessibility has become an important focus in software development; the goal is to allow as many people as possible, regardless of their capabilities, to use software. We have investigated the methods that software teams prefer when testing the accessibility of their software. We conducted a large-scale study to evaluate six methods, using a sample of 53 people who work on various software teams. We present a detailed breakdown of the results for each testing method and analyze the differences between the methods. Our findings show that there are statistically significant differences in team members’ preferences, particularly for those with different roles. This implies that a software team should not choose a single method for all team members.

Research Article

TransPrint: A Method for Fabricating Flexible Transparent Free-Form Displays

TransPrint is a method for fabricating flexible, transparent free-form displays based on electrochromism. Using screen-printing or inkjet printing of electrochromic ink, plus a straightforward assembly process, TransPrint enables rapid prototyping of displays by nonexperts. The displays are nonlight-emissive and only require power to switch state and support the integration of capacitive touch sensing for interactivity. We present instructions and best practices on how to design and assemble the displays and discuss the benefits and shortcomings of the TransPrint approach. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approach, we present six application prototypes.

Research Article

Influence of Personality on Shape-Based Design Activities

As the literature demonstrates, designers’ personality influences design activities like different ways to represent environments and/or products, technological advances, etc.. Nevertheless, an exhaustive analysis on the influence of personality on design activities involving different representations is missing. This research explores this gap by studying this influence on specific design activities, the shape-based ones (i.e., analysis of specific shapes and highlighting of functions suggested by them). People showing different personalities undergo tests where they carry out design activities exploiting several representations. The results confirm the influence of personality on shape-based design activities and allow highlighting different keys to interpret and exploit these results. Thanks to the results of this study, researchers can increase their knowledge about subjective aspects of design as well as about how these aspects coexist with classic and emerging representations. As well, designers can try to maximize the effectiveness of their efforts by selecting the best combinations of personality, representations, and characteristics of the expected design results time by time.

Research Article

A Plurisensorial Device to Support Human Smell in Hazardous Environment and Prevent Respiratory Disease

Products embedded with wearable technologies can be a useful tool to support humans’ senses in situations where they can be insufficient, mistaken, or misleading. In this article, we discuss the findings of a two-year Transnational European Research Project named “POD: Plurisensorial Device to Prevent Occupational Disease.” The research was based on the evidence that human senses are not always reliable in making objective judgments. The specific field of application was coating plant, an environment that exposes workers to the risk of inhaling dangerous particles. The results obtained in the first part of the research pointed out that workers, largely relying on their sense of smell, which instead is often untrustworthy, do not protect themselves enough. Based on this ground, we designed a wearable system for providing workers with objective data both on their respiration activity and on the quality of the air in the working environment, with the ultimate goal of engaging them in wearing their personal protecting equipment (PPE). The article describes the development and testing of the solution; an example of how wearable technologies can enhance senses and improve workers’ health.

Research Article

VR Locomotion in the New Era of Virtual Reality: An Empirical Comparison of Prevalent Techniques

The latest technical and interaction advancements within the virtual reality (VR) field have marked a new era, not only for VR, but also for VR locomotion. In this era, well-established, prevalent VR locomotion techniques are mostly used as points of comparison for benchmarking of new VR locomotion designs. At the same time, there is the need for more exploratory, comparative studies of contemporary VR locomotion techniques, so that their distinguished interaction aspects can be documented and guide the design process of new techniques. This article presents a comparative, empirical evaluation study of contemporary and prevalent VR locomotion techniques, examining the user experience (UX) they offer. First, the prevalent VR locomotion techniques are identified based on literature, i.e., walking-in-place, controller/joystick, and teleportation. Twenty-six adults are enrolled in the study and perform a game-like task using the techniques. The study follows a mixed methods approach, utilising the System Usability Scale survey, the Game Experience Questionnaire, and a semistructured interview to assess user experiences. Results indicate that the walking-in-place technique offers the highest immersion but also presents high levels of psychophysical discomfort. Controller/joystick VR locomotion is perceived as easy-to-use due to the users’ familiarity with controllers, whereas teleportation is considered to be effective due to its fast navigation, although its visual ‘jumps’ do break the users’ sense of immersion. Based on the interviews, the users focused on the following interaction dimensions to describe their VR locomotion experiences: (i) immersion and flow, (ii) ease-of-use and mastering, (iii) competence and sense of effectiveness, and (iv) psychophysical discomfort. The study implications for VR locomotion are discussed, along with the study limitations and the future direction for research.

Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
Acceptance to publication-
CiteScore1.390
Impact Factor-
 Submit