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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2008, Article ID 381086, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/381086
Research Article

The Development of LinguaBytes: An Interactive Tangible Play and Learning System to Stimulate the Language Development of Toddlers with Multiple Disabilities

1Designing Quality in Interaction, Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2PonTeM, Wijchenseweg 122 D, 6538 SX Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3Department of Special Education, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Postbus 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands
4ID-StudioLab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628 CE Delft, The Netherlands

Received 1 October 2007; Revised 12 August 2008; Accepted 19 October 2008

Academic Editor: Adrian Cheok

Copyright © 2008 Bart Hengeveld et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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