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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2008, Article ID 639435, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/639435
Research Article

The Puzzling Life of Autistic Toddlers: Design Guidelines from the LINKX Project

ID-StudioLab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft, The Netherlands

Received 30 September 2007; Revised 17 April 2008; Accepted 24 July 2008

Academic Editor: Adrian Cheok

Copyright © 2008 Helma van Rijn and Pieter Jan Stappers. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [11 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • Nurul Nadhrah Kamaruzaman, and Nazean Jomhari, “Digital Game-Based Learning for Low Functioning Autism Children in Learning Al-Quran,” 2013 Taibah University International Conference on Advances in Information Technology for the Holy Quran and Its Sciences, pp. 184–189, . View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Hayeon Jeong, Daniel Pieter Saakes, and Uichin Lee, “I-Eng,” Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers - UbiComp '15, pp. 305–308, . View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Amani Indunil Soysa, Abdullah Al Mahmud, and Blair Kuys, “Co-designing tablet computer applications with Sri Lankan practitioners to support children with ASD,” Proceedings of the 17th ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children - IDC '18, pp. 413–419, . View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Helma van Rijn, Joost van Hoof, and Pieter Jan Stappers, “Designing Leisure Products for People With Dementia: Developing ''the Chitchatters'' Game,” American Journal of Alzheimers Disease and Other Dementias, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 74–89, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Nigel Newbutt, “The Development of Virtual Reality Technologies for People on the Autism Spectrum,” Innovative Technologies to Benefit Children on the Autism Spectrum, pp. 230–252, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Beste Özcan, Daniele Caligiore, Valerio Sperati, Tania Moretta, and Gianluca Baldassarre, “Transitional Wearable Companions: A Novel Concept of Soft Interactive Social Robots to Improve Social Skills in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” International Journal of Social Robotics, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • S. Fletcher-Watson, H. Pain, S. Hammond, A. Humphry, and H. McConachie, “Designing for young children with autism spectrum disorder: A case study of an iPad app,” International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Sevi Merter, and Deniz Hasırcı, “A participatory product design process with children with autism spectrum disorder,” CoDesign, pp. 1–18, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Nigel Newbutt, “The Development of Virtual Reality Technologies for People on the Autism Spectrum,” Mobile Computing and Wireless Networks: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, pp. 518–540, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Morton Ann Gernsbacher, Adam R Raimond, Jennifer L Stevenson, Jilana S Boston, and Bev Harp, “Do puzzle pieces and autism puzzle piece logos evoke negative associations?,” Autism, pp. 136236131772712, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Lal Bozgeyikli, Andrew Raij, Srinivas Katkoori, and Redwan Alqasemi, “A Survey on Virtual Reality for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Design Considerations,” IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 133–151, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar