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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 123725, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/123725
Research Article

Static and Dynamic User Portraits

1Institute of Applied Arts, National Chiao-Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
2Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, Caminho da Penteada, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
3Institute of Creative Industrial Design, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan

Received 18 May 2012; Revised 12 September 2012; Accepted 13 October 2012

Academic Editor: Bill Kapralos

Copyright © 2012 Ko-Hsun Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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