Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 124728, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/124728
Research Article

BCI Could Make Old Two-Player Games Even More Fun: A Proof of Concept with “Connect Four”

CRNL, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, INSERM, CNRS, University Lyon 1, Dycog Team, 95 Bd Pinel, 69500 Bron, France

Received 6 July 2012; Accepted 5 November 2012

Academic Editor: Christoph Braun

Copyright © 2012 Emmanuel Maby et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. N. Birbaumer, A. Ramos Murguialday, C. Weber, and P. Montoya, “Neurofeedback and brain-computer interface. Clinical applications,” International Review of Neurobiology, vol. 86, pp. 107–117, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. L. A. Farwell and E. Donchin, “Talking off the top of your head: toward a mental prosthesis utilizing event-related brain potentials,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 510–523, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. G. Pfurtscheller and C. Neuper, “Motor imagery direct communication,” Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 89, no. 7, pp. 1123–1134, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. R. Wolpaw, D. J. McFarland, G. W. Neat, and C. A. Forneris, “An EEG-based brain-computer interface for cursor control,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 252–259, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. N. Birbaumer, N. Ghanayim, T. Hinterberger et al., “A spelling device for the paralysed,” Nature, vol. 398, no. 6725, pp. 297–298, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. R. Leeb, D. Friedman, G. R. Müller-Putz, R. Scherer, M. Slater, and G. Pfurtscheller, “Self-paced (asynchronous) BCI control of a wheelchair in virtual environments: a case study with a tetraplegic,” Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience, vol. 2007, Article ID 79642, 8 pages, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. Maby, M. Perrin, D. Morlet et al., “Evaluation in a locked-in patient of the OpenViBE P300-speller,” in Proceedings of the 5th International Brain-Computer Interface Conference, pp. 272–275, 2011.
  8. A. Nijholt, D. Tan, G. Pfurtscheller et al., “Brain-computer interfacing for intelligent systems,” IEEE Intelligent Systems, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 72–79, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. B. Graimann, B. Allison, and A. Gräser, “New applications for noninvasive Brain-Computer Interfaces and the need for engaging training environments,” in Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games Workshop at the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, pp. 25–28, 2007.
  10. R. Leeb, F. Lee, C. Keinrath, R. Scherer, H. Bischof, and G. Pfurtscheller, “Brain-computer communication: motivation, aim, and impact of exploring a virtual apartment,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 473–482, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. van Aart, E. Klaver, C. Bartneck, L. Feijs, and P. Peters, “Neurofeedback gaming for wellbeing,” in Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games Workshop at the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, pp. 3–5, 2007.
  12. A. Nijholt, D. Oude Bos, and B. Reuderink, “Turning shortcomings into challenges: brain-computer interfaces for games,” Intelligent Technologies For Interactive Entertainment, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 153–168, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  13. B. A. S. Hasan and J. Q. Gan, “Hangman BCI: an unsupervised adaptive self-paced Brain-Computer Interface for playing games,” Computers in Biology and Medicine, vol. 42, pp. 598–606, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. J. D. Bayliss, “Use of the evoked potential P3 component for control in a virtual apartment,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 113–116, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Finke, A. Lenhardt, and H. Ritter, “The MindGame: a P300-based brain-computer interface game,” Neural Networks, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1329–1333, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. E. C. Lalor, S. P. Kelly, C. Finucane et al., “Steady-state VEP-based brain-computer interface control in an immersive 3D gaming environment,” Eurasip Journal on Applied Signal Processing, vol. 2005, no. 19, pp. 3156–3164, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. N. Yee, “Motivations for play in online games,” Cyberpsychology and Behavior, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 772–775, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. C. Guger, G. Krausz, B. Z. Allison, and G. Edlinger, “Comparison of dry and gel based electrodes for P300 brain-computer interfaces,” Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol. 6, article 60, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  19. F. Lotte, “Brain-computer interfaces for 3D games: hype or hope?” in Proceedings of the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG '11), pp. 325–327, 2011.
  20. P. Brunner, S. Joshi, S. Briskin, J. R. Wolpaw, H. Bischof, and G. Schalk, “Does the 'P300' speller depend on eye gaze?” Journal of Neural Engineering, vol. 7, no. 5, Article ID 56013, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. S. Treder and B. Blankertz, “(C)overt attention and visual speller design in an ERP-based brain-computer interface,” Behavioral and Brain Functions, vol. 6, article 28, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. Fabiani, D. Karis, and E. Donchin, “P300 and recall in an incidental memory paradigm,” Psychophysiology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 298–308, 1986. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. L. A. Farwell and E. Donchin, “Talking off the top of your head: toward a mental prosthesis utilizing event-related brain potentials,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 510–523, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. E. Donchin, K. M. Spencer, and R. Wijesinghe, “The mental prosthesis: assessing the speed of a P300-based brain- computer interface,” IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 174–179, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Datta, R. Cusack, K. Hawkins et al., “The P300 as a marker of waning attention and error propensity,” Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience, vol. 2007, Article ID 93968, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. E. Maby, G. Gibert, P. E. Aguera, M. Perrin, and O. Bertrand, “The OpenViBE P300-Speller scenario: a thorough online evaluation,” in Proceedings of the Human Brain Mapping Conference, 2010.
  27. M. Perrin, E. Maby, R. Bouet, O. Bertrand, and J. Mattout, “Detecting and interpreting responses to feedback in BCI,” in Proceedings of the 5th International Brain-Computer Interface Conference, pp. 116–119, 2011.
  28. H. Cecotti, B. Rivet, M. Congedo et al., “A robust sensor-selection method for P300 brain-computer interfaces,” Journal of Neural Engineering, vol. 8, no. 1, Article ID 016001, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. Y. Renard, F. Lotte, G. Gibert et al., “OpenViBE: an open-source software platform to design, test, and use brain-computer interfaces in real and virtual environments,” Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 35–53, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. B. Rivet, A. Souloumiac, V. Attina, and G. Gibert, “xDAWN algorithm to enhance evoked potentials: application to brain-computer interface,” IEEE Transactions on Bio-Medical Engineering, vol. 56, no. 8, pp. 2035–2043, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. R. M. Taylor, T. C. Hudson, A. Seeger, H. Weber, J. Juliano, and A. T. Helser, “VRPN: a device-independent, network-transparent VR peripheral system,” in Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (VRST '01), pp. 55–61, November 2001. View at Scopus
  32. D. Lehmann and W. Skrandies, “Reference-free identification of components of checkerboard-evoked multichannel potential fields,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 48, no. 6, pp. 609–621, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. C. Kleih, F. Nijboer, S. Halder, and A. Kübler, “Motivation modulates the P300 amplitude during brain-computer interface use,” Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 121, no. 7, pp. 1023–1031, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus