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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 835246, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/835246
Research Article

Accuracy and Coordination of Spatial Frames of Reference during the Exploration of Virtual Maps: Interest for Orientation and Mobility of Blind People?

1CNRS UMR 6285 LabSTICC-IHSEV/HAAL, Telecom Bretagne, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, CS 83818-29238 Brest Cedex 3, France
2LaTIM-Inserm U 1101, Université de Brest (UEB), Brest, France

Received 28 March 2012; Revised 16 July 2012; Accepted 24 July 2012

Academic Editor: Antonio Krüger

Copyright © 2012 Mathieu Simonnet and Stéphane Vieilledent. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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