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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 420169, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/420169
Research Article

Computer Breakdown as a Stress Factor during Task Completion under Time Pressure: Identifying Gender Differences Based on Skin Conductance

1School of Management, University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Wehrgrabengasse 1-3, 4400 Steyr, Austria
2Department of Business Informatics—Information Engineering, University of Linz, Linz, Austria
3Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Linz General Hospital, Linz, Austria

Received 3 May 2013; Revised 2 September 2013; Accepted 10 September 2013

Academic Editor: Ian Oakley

Copyright © 2013 René Riedl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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