Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2013, Article ID 879563, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/879563
Research Article

Virtual/Real Transfer in a Large-Scale Environment: Impact of Active Navigation as a Function of the Viewpoint Displacement Effect and Recall Tasks

1Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France
2Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux II, Laboratoire Handicap et Système Nerveux EA 4136, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex, France
3INRIA, PHOENIX Team, Bordeaux Sud-Ouest, 400 Avenue de la Vieille Tour, 33400 Talence, France

Received 14 May 2013; Revised 13 August 2013; Accepted 27 August 2013

Academic Editor: Ian Oakley

Copyright © 2013 Grégory Wallet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. W. Siegel and S. H. White, “The development of spatial representation of large scale environments,” in Advances In Child Development and Behavior, H. Reese, Ed., vol. 10, pp. 10–55, Academic Press, New York, NY, USA, 1975. View at Google Scholar
  2. J. Wiener, S. B. Büchner, and C. H. Hölscher, “Taxonomy of human wayfinding tasks: a knowledge-based approach,” Spatial Cognition & Computation, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1–14, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  3. D. R. Montello, “A new framework for understanding the acquisition of spatial knowledge in large-scale environments,” in Spatial and Temporal Reasoning in Geographic Information Systems, M. J. Egenhofer and R. G. Golledge, Eds., pp. 143–154, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  4. T. Ishikawa and D. R. Montello, “Spatial knowledge acquisition from direct experience in the environment: individual differences in the development of metric knowledge and the integration of separately learned places,” Cognitive Psychology, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 93–129, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. Berthoz, “Parietal and hippocampal contribution to topokinetic and topographic memory,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, vol. 352, no. 1360, pp. 1437–1448, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. P. Thorndyke and B. Hayes-Roth, “Differences in spatial knowledge acquired from maps and navigation,” Cognitive Psychology, vol. 14, pp. 560–589, 1982. View at Google Scholar
  7. D. H. Uttal, J. A. Fisher, and H. A. Taylor, “Words and maps: developmental changes in mental models of spatial information acquired from descriptions and depictions,” Developmental Science, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 221–235, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. L. S. Liben, “Environmental cognition through direct and representational experiences: a life-span perspective,” in Environment, Cognition, and Action: An Integrated Approach, T. Garling and G. W. Evans, Eds., pp. 245–276, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 1991. View at Google Scholar
  9. D. H. Uttal, J. A. Fisher, and H. A. Taylor, “Words and maps: developmental changes in mental models of spatial information acquired from descriptions and depictions,” Developmental Science, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 221–235, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. T. Wolbers and M. Hegarty, “What determines our navigational abilities?” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 138–146, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. P. Péruch, L. Belingard, and C. Thinus-Blanc, “Transfer of spatial knowledge from virtual to real environments,” in Spatial Cognition II, LNAI, C. Freksa, W. Brauer, C. Habel, and K. F. Wender, Eds., vol. 1849, pp. 253–264, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  12. B. G. Witmer, J. H. Bailey, B. W. Knerr, and K. C. Parsons, “Virtual spaces and real world places: transfer of route knowledge,” International Journal of Human Computer Studies, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 413–428, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. P. Peruch and P. Wilson, “Active versus passive learning and testing in a complex outside built environment,” Cognitive Processing, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 218–227, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. N. Foreman, J. Stirk, J. Pohl et al., “Spatial information transfer from virtual to real versions of the Kiel locomotor maze,” Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 112, no. 1-2, pp. 53–61, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. E. Richardson, D. R. Montello, and M. Hegarty, “Spatial knowledge acquisition from maps and from navigation in real and virtual environments,” Memory and Cognition, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 741–750, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. A. Ruddle, S. J. Payne, and D. M. Jones, “Navigating buildings in desk-top virtual environments: experimental investigations using extended navigational experience,” Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 143–159, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. D. Waller, E. Hunt, and D. Knapp, “The transfer of spatial knowledge in virtual environment training,” Presence, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 129–143, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. G. Wallet, H. Sauzéon, J. Rodrigues, and B. N'Kaoua, “Use of virtual reality for spatial knowledge transfer: Effects of passive/active exploration mode in simple and complex routes for three different recall tasks,” in Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (VRST '08), pp. 175–178, October 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. G. Wallet, H. Sauzéon, J. Rodrigues, F. Larrue, and B. N'Kaoua, “Virtual/real transfer of spatial learning: impact of activity according to the retention delay,” Annual Review of CyberTherapy and Telemedicine, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 115–118, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. G. Wallet, H. Sauzéon, P. A. Pala, F. Larrue, X. Zheng, and B. N'Kaoua, “Virtual/real transfer of spatial knowledge: benefit from visual fidelity provided in a virtual environment and impact of active navigation,” Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, vol. 14, no. 7-8, pp. 417–423, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. J. Gibson, “Observations on active touch,” Psychological Review, vol. 69, no. 6, pp. 477–491, 1962. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. S. L. Cohen and R. Cohen, “The role of activity in spatial cognition,” in The Development of Spatial Cognition, R. Cohen, Ed., pp. 199–221, Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc, Hillsdale, NJ, USA, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  23. P. N. Wilson, N. Foreman, R. Gillett, and D. Stanton, “Active versus passive processing of spatial information in a computer-simulated environment,” Ecological Psychology, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 207–222, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. P. P. Péruch, J. L. Vercher, and G. M. Gauthier, “Acquisition of spatial knowledge through visual exploration of simulated environments,” Ecological Psychology, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1–20, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. K. H. James, G. K. Humphrey, T. Vilis, B. Corrie, R. Baddour, and M. A. Goodale, “Active and passive learning of three-dimensional object structure within an immersive virtual reality environment,” Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 383–390, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. J. Hahm, K. Lee, S.-L. Lim, S.-Y. Kim, H.-T. Kim, and J.-H. Lee, “Effects of active navigation on object recognition in virtual environments,” Cyberpsychology and Behavior, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 305–308, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. P. N. Wilson, “Active exploration of a virtual environment does not promote orientation or memory for objects,” Environment and Behavior, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 752–763, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. F. Gaunet, M. Vidal, A. Kemeny, and A. Berthoz, “Active, passive and snapshot exploration in a virtual environment: influence on scene memory, reorientation and path memory,” Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 409–420, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. N. Wilson and P. Péruch, “The influence of interactivity and attention on spatial learning in a desk-top virtual environment,” Cahiers de Psychologie Cognitive, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 601–633, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. N. Foreman, G. Sandamas, and D. Newson, “Distance underestimation in virtual space is sensitive to gender but not activity-passivity or mode of interaction,” Cyberpsychology and Behavior, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 451–457, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. B. M. Brooks, E. A. Attree, F. D. Rose, B. R. Clifford, and A. G. Leadbetter, “The specificity of memory enhancement during interaction with a virtual environment,” Memory, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 65–78, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. A. Carassa, G. Geminiani, F. Morganti, and D. Varotto, “Active and passive spatial learning in a complex virtual environment: the effects of efficient exploration,” Cognitive Processing, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 65–81, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  33. E. R. Chrastil and W. H. Warren, “Active and passive contributions to spatial learning,” Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 1–23, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. N. Burgess, “Spatial cognition and the brain,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1124, pp. 77–97, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. R. P. Darken and B. Peterson, “Spatial orientation, wayfinding, and representation,” in Handbook of Virtual Environments: Design, Implementation, and Applications, K. M. Stanney, Ed., pp. 493–518, Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc, Hillsdale, NJ, USA, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  36. B. G. Witmer, W. J. Sadowski, and N. M. Finkelstein, “VE-based training strategies for acquiring survey knowledge,” Presence, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1–18, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. J. P. Guilford and W. S. Zimmermann, Guilford-Zimmerman Aptitude Survey: Manual of Instructions and Interpretations, Consulting psychologists press, Minneapolis, Minn, USA, 1981.
  38. S. G. Vandenberg and A. R. Kuse, “Mental rotations, a group test of three-dimensional spatial visualization,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 599–604, 1978. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. F. D. Rose, B. M. Brooks, and A. A. Rizzo, “Virtual reality in brain damage rehabilitation: review,” Cyberpsychology and Behavior, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 241–262, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. C. D. Morris, J. D. Bransford, and J. J. Franks, “Levels of processing versus transfer appropriate processing,” Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 519–533, 1977. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. B. M. Brooks and F. D. Rose, “The use of virtual reality in memory rehabilitation: current findings and future directions,” NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 147–157, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus