Table of Contents
Advances in Hepatology
Volume 2015, Article ID 605292, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/605292
Research Article

The Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration

1Department of Gastroenterology and Medicine, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka 814-0180, Japan
2The Division of Advanced Clinical Research for Viral Hepatitis and Liver Cancer, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka 814-0180, Japan
3Department of Gastroenterology, Murakami Karindoh Hospital, Fukuoka 819-8585, Japan

Received 7 October 2014; Revised 3 March 2015; Accepted 10 March 2015

Academic Editor: Junyong Park

Copyright © 2015 Keiji Yokoyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) is a highly effective therapy for gastric varices with liver cirrhosis. We have investigated the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after BRTO. We enrolled 71 patients with viral hepatitis in which HCC had not appeared with liver imaging findings at the time of BRTO. The overall survival rate after BRTO was 86.8%, 76.1%, and 50.5% at 1, 3, and 5 years. The occurrence rate of HCC after BRTO was 20.9%, 41.1%, and 60.7% at 1, 3, and 5 years, especially showing a higher occurrence of HCC at one year. Meanwhile, the occurrence rate of HCC after treatment which excluded BRTO for esophagogastric varices in patients was 6.3%, 19.2%, and 42.5% at 1, 3, and 5 years. The log-rank test revealed that the occurrence rate of HCC after treatment was significantly higher in the BRTO group compared with that in the non-BRTO group (). The recurrence rate of HCC after BRTO was 35.8% and 80.0% at 1 and 3 years. The present study demonstrated a high incidence of HCC after BRTO in liver cirrhosis patients with viral hepatitis infection. We have suggested the potential for BRTO to accelerate hepatocarcinogenesis.