Table of Contents
Asian Journal of Neuroscience
Volume 2014, Article ID 753286, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/753286
Research Article

Impact of Obesity and Underweight on Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

1Orthopedic Department, Orthopedic Research Center, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 3316-913791, Iran
2Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 3316-913791, Iran
3Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 3316-913791, Iran
4Orthopedic Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 3316-913791, Iran
5College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran

Received 16 November 2013; Accepted 15 December 2013; Published 12 January 2014

Academic Editors: H.-Y. Lee and T. Rekand

Copyright © 2014 Farzad Omidi-Kashani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The relationship between underweight and lumbar spine surgery is still unknown. Aim. To evaluate the effect of underweight versus obesity based on surgical outcome of lumbar disc herniation. Material and Method. In this retrospective study, we evaluated 206 patients (112 male and 94 female) with a mean age of years old (ranged 20–72) who have been surgically treated due to the refractory simple primary L4-L5 disc herniation. We followed them up for a mean period of months (ranged 24–57). We used Body Mass Index (BMI), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for categorization, disability, and pain assessment, respectively. We used Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests for statistics. Results. Surgical discectomy in all weight groups was associated with significant improvement in pain and disability, but intergroup comparison showed these improvements in both underweight and obese groups and they were significantly lower than in normal weight group. Excellent and good satisfaction rate was also somewhat lower in both these ends of weight spectrum, but statistically insignificant. Conclusion. Both obesity and underweight may have adverse prognostic influences on the surgical outcome of lumbar disc herniation, although their impact on subjective satisfaction rate seems to be insignificant.