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Advances in Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 762320, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/762320
Review Article

Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

Department of Neurology, Academic Block, G.B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi 110002, India

Received 31 May 2014; Revised 18 August 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014; Published 30 September 2014

Academic Editor: João Quevedo

Copyright © 2014 Neera Chaudhry and Ashish Kumar Duggal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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