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Advances in Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 7579069, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7579069
Research Article

The Protocol of Choice for Treatment of Snake Bite

1Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Taleghani Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2Toxicological Research Center, Department of Clinical Toxicology, Loghman-Hakim Hospital, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3Excellence Center of Clinical Toxicology, Iranian Ministry of Health, Tehran, Iran
4Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Received 15 April 2016; Revised 3 August 2016; Accepted 18 August 2016

Academic Editor: Giovanni Storto

Copyright © 2016 Afshin Mohammad Alizadeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of the current study is to compare three different methods of treatment of snake bite to determine the most efficient one. To unify the protocol of snake bite treatment in our center, we retrospectively reviewed files of the snake-bitten patients who had been referred to us between 2010 and 2014. They were contacted for follow-up using phone calls. Demographic and on-arrival characteristics, protocol used for treatment (WHO/Haddad/GF), and outcome/complications were evaluated. Patients were entered into one of the protocol groups and compared. Of a total of 63 patients, 56 (89%) were males. Five, 19, and 28 patients were managed by Haddad, WHO, or GF protocols, respectively. Eleven patients had fallen into both GF and WHO protocols and were excluded. Serum sickness was significantly more common when WHO protocol was used while 100% of the compartment syndromes and 71% of deformities had been reported after GF protocol. The most important complications were considered to be deformity, compartment syndrome, and amputation and were more frequent after the use of WHO and GF protocols (23.1% versus 76.9%; none in Haddad; = NS). Haddad protocol seems to be the best for treatment of snake-bitten patients in our region. However, this cannot be strictly concluded because of the limited sample size and nonsignificant values.