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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2013, Article ID 367674, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/367674
Research Article

Spatial and Temporal Trends in PM2.5 Organic and Elemental Carbon across the United States

1Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2National Park Service, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
3Air Quality Assessment Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA

Received 21 February 2013; Accepted 26 July 2013

Academic Editor: Junji Cao

Copyright © 2013 J. L. Hand et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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