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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2013, Article ID 731647, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/731647
Research Article

The Impact of Mesoscale Environmental Uncertainty on the Prediction of a Tornadic Supercell Storm Using Ensemble Data Assimilation Approach

1Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072, USA
2NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, National Weather Center, 120 David L. Boren Boulevard, Norman, OK 73072, USA
3Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072, USA

Received 10 May 2013; Revised 1 August 2013; Accepted 22 August 2013

Academic Editor: Ming Xue

Copyright © 2013 Nusrat Yussouf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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