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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2014, Article ID 135012, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/135012
Research Article

A System Dynamics Approach to Modeling Future Climate Scenarios: Quantifying and Projecting Patterns of Evapotranspiration and Precipitation in the Salton Sea Watershed

1U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, USA
2Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA

Received 14 February 2014; Revised 17 April 2014; Accepted 18 April 2014; Published 19 May 2014

Academic Editor: Dong Jiang

Copyright © 2014 Michael E. Kjelland et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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