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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 478419, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/478419
Research Article

Automatic Tracking and Characterization of Cumulonimbus Clouds from FY-2C Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Images

1Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
2Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
3The PLA Information Engineering University, Zhengzhou 450001, China
4Key Laboratory of Agri-Informatics, Ministry of Agriculture/Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
5ICube, UdS, CNRS, 300 boulevard Sebastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch, France
6National Meteorological Information Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081, China

Received 21 March 2014; Revised 2 August 2014; Accepted 8 August 2014; Published 31 August 2014

Academic Editor: Ismail Gultepe

Copyright © 2014 Yu Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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