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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2015, Article ID 483679, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/483679
Research Article

Trends in Downward Solar Radiation at the Surface over North America from Climate Model Projections and Implications for Solar Energy

School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, USA

Received 1 May 2014; Accepted 6 August 2014

Academic Editor: Taewoo Lee

Copyright © 2015 Gerardo Andres Saenz and Huei-Ping Huang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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