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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2015, Article ID 973151, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/973151
Research Article

Numerical Simulations of the 1 May 2012 Deep Convection Event over Cuba: Sensitivity to Cumulus and Microphysical Schemes in a High-Resolution Model

1Instituto de Meteorología, Apartado 17032, 11700 La Habana, Cuba
2Uni Research Climate, The Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen, Norway

Received 23 April 2015; Revised 14 July 2015; Accepted 16 July 2015

Academic Editor: Adel Hanna

Copyright © 2015 Yandy G. Mayor and Michel D. S. Mesquita. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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