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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2016, Article ID 4371840, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4371840
Editorial

Advances in Remote Sensing and Modeling of Terrestrial Hydrometeorological Processes and Extremes

1State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering and College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, 1 Xikang Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098, China
2Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, The University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Boulevard, Norman, OK 73072, USA
3School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
4Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX 77446, USA
5Forage and Livestock Production Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, El Reno, OK 73036, USA

Received 12 June 2016; Accepted 13 June 2016

Copyright © 2016 Ke Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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