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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2016, Article ID 5051476, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5051476
Research Article

Climatological Features of Korea-Landfalling Tropical Cyclones

1National Institute of Meteorological Research, Jeju 63568, Republic of Korea
2National Typhoon Center, Korea Meteorological Administration, Jeju 63614, Republic of Korea
3Department of Global Environment, Keimyung University, Daegu 42601, Republic of Korea
4Green Simulation, Co., Ltd., SK HUB-SKY, 1523 Jungangdae-ro, Dongrae-gu, Busan 46227, Republic of Korea

Received 6 July 2015; Accepted 24 August 2015

Academic Editor: Xiaofeng Li

Copyright © 2016 Jae-Won Choi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study analyzed the interdecadal variation by applying the statistical change-point analysis to the frequency of the tropical cyclone (TC) that landed in the Korean Peninsula (KP) for the recent 54 years (1951 to 2004) and performed cluster classification of the Korea-landfall TC tracks using a Fuzzy Clustering Method (FCM). First, in the interdecadal variation analysis, frequency of TC that landed in the KP was largely categorized into three periods: high frequency period from 1951 to 1965, low frequency period from 1966 to 1985, and high frequency period from 1986 to 2004. The cluster analysis result of the Korea-landfall TC tracks produced the optimum number of clusters as four. In more detail, Cluster A refers to a pattern of landing in the southern coast in the KP starting from East China Sea followed by heading north while Cluster B refers to a pattern of landing in the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, also starting from East China Sea followed by heading north. Cluster C refers to a pattern of landing in the southern region of the west coast in the KP moving from mainland China while Cluster D refers to a pattern of landing in the mid-north region of the west coast in the Korean Peninsula, also moving from mainland China.